Horvath is primarily known for his high-gloss and refined, large-scale oil paintings that represent our cultural obsession with the appearance of luxury, celebrity, and consumption. In his practice, he begins with an abstract, almost other-worldly sculpture that then serves as inspiration for the resulting highly polished and detailed painting, often mistaken for a digital image. His most recent body of work explores these sculptures with greater depth and detail. Horvath has now escalated his practice of creating a preliminary sculpture by using more substantial materials. Through the use of porcelain, his sculptures have become more permanent and thus represent works in their own right instead of simply a preliminary work or reflection of the grander oil painting. A large collection of his new porcelain sculptures at Gallery 924 have never been seen before outside of his studio.

In his first major exhibition in Indianapolis since 2005, Faust offers a wide range of materials with one singular focus. This current body of work investigates the natural environment from two distinct positions. Faust explores the current state of the natural world as both a reverent observer and a concerned occupant of the Earth. The paintings on canvas and wood represent his celebration of nature, while the "Fossil Fuel Series" exhibition prints deal with his pointed angst at the degradation being perpetuated on the environment. The palette of the two series represents the extreme opposite sides of the spectrum, using the most vivid color combinations or alternately the most subdued monochromatic grays. In both series, the commentary is bold, thoughtful, and intense.

James Wille Faust is a 2007-2008 Arts Council Creative Renewal Arts Fellow.

Unblocked represents a journey of rediscovering the creative process through pattern and color. Rao's previous work was mostly figurative, but in 2011, this Butler University professor began to explore pattern. This marked the beginning of an exploration of color that has led to complex and unexpected destinations. Over the past two years Rao has made large-scale paintings exploring color relationships, pattern, typography and landscape. The paintings rely on a grid of color squares, which in these paintings allude to pixels of fabric patterns. They play on the human tendency to recognize images in patterns everywhere - in the intervals of cracks on the sidewalk or images found in cloud formations.

Increasingly, mathematical patterns play a rle in the structure of paintings. Rao alternates colors in syncopated patterns, grouping them by hue, color, temperature and value. They play to the joy found in color choices and the excitement of the creative process - of creativity rediscovered and unblocked.

Opening Reception: Friday, September 6 as part of IDADA First Friday Art Tour

Working strictly with film and manual equipment, M.W. LaFary began a journey in 2010 to explore and document a growing phenomenon. The visual urban landscape of Indianapolis, along with many American cities, was showing distressful signs of systematic decay and deterioration. With thousands of once occupied Indianapolis homes and businesses boarded-up and overgrown, and just months before the foreclosure crisis would empty thousands more, a new series of work was born. DECLINE seeks to document and reflect upon the growing signs of trouble in the local landscape.

LaFary has traveled a great deal of central and southern Indiana and even into northern Kentucky exploring abandoned, boarded, or otherwise disregarded spaces. The body of work has grown to include hundreds of exposures made at dozens of sites, many of which no longer exist. For LaFary, this vast collection of images is the story of everything. They are the story of the end.

Opening Reception: Friday, August 2 as part of IDADA First Friday Art Tour.

It has been said that auto-biography is impossible. One will never be able to view themselves in the same way the world sees them. That has not hindered the thousands of artists over the centuries who have used self-portraits as a means to express their core essence.

Artists have used self-portraits as studies, as final works, and as a way to explore their inner demons and desires. Inflated self-importance (think Albrecht Durer). Self-doubt and fear (think Edvard Munch). Social critique (think Cindy Sherman), and the list continues.

Join Gallery 924 during June and July, as we present a wide array of central Indiana artists' visions of self. Works include painting, drawing, printmaking, ceramics, sculpture, video, poetry, and more.

Opening Reception: Friday, June 7 as part of IDADA First Friday Gallery Tour

Image: Amelia Morris, From the series An Honest Assessment, 2011

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May 2013Recent work by Bonnie Stahlecker

Artist Talk: Thursday, May 23, 5 - 7pm - Please join us for an after work drink and conversation with the artist, Bonnie Stahlecker who will discuss her process for creating this riveting new body of work. No RSVP necessary. Free parking.

Stahlecker, an Indianapolis-based artist known for her sculptural artist books, has created a new body of work that explores the human need to seek protection from both real and perceived perils. Stahlecker is intrigued by the notion that throughout history all cultures have sought to believe in a deity who could intervene on their behalf and offer safe passage. Her shield-like pieces speak to the different methods of solicitation of this protection, from amulets and scapular medals to chants and incantations. She combines an historical exploration of this phenomena with her visual aesthetic of organic pattern, image, and language marks. The shield-like images not only serve as iconic and powerful symbols, but also as a new evolution of her sculptural work rich with layers of texture and meaning.

Stahlecker is a 1999 and 2013 Arts Council of Indianapolis Creative Renewal Arts Fellow.

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April 2013No image grabs more attention, incites more emotion, or holds more mystery than the depiction of someone’s face. Reel focuses on the entire presence of each person in her delicate yet colossal portraits. The large scale of these pieces gives them a new role in the gallery. Not only are they works to be viewed and interpreted, but can themselves be seen as audience and critic. Layers of ink and conté crayon stare quietly back at spectators with a certain authority. In exchange for a few moments of observation, each portrait has a story to share, a conversation to have with its viewer.

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